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  1. Junior Member Registered Member
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    #1

    Default Pursue MCSA Win 7 for entry level helpdesk?

    I'm trying to re-enter IT after a being let go from the last IT job I had.That was 2 years ago. Since then I got the CCNA R&S and A+ certs. I've been applying to random Helpdesk jobs and mostly never hear back or I'm told they chose someone who has better qualifications. I think my past job history plus length of time since I last held a technical job (I'm using that term liberally, while there was a ticketing system and break-fix type work done, it revolved entirely around an in-house SaaS app they deployed to client sites) is hurting me. Right now just to get my foot in the door I'm looking for a more traditional entry level Helpdesk job anywhere. I was thinking about going after the MCSA Win 7 as it's still offered until 7/31. I hope to learn a lot more about windows in the process as I don't feel I know much of anything about the system. I chose to certify in Win 7 in spite of its age because its still at ~33% marketshare and I know it takes a long time for most businesses to getting around to upgrading. Plus I'll lose my chance soon if I don't take it. But this is a guess since I don't really know what's going on. I was planning on pursuing win 10 afterwords.I'm asking if this is a good idea or a good use of money/time.source for win 7 usage:Desktop Windows Version Market Share United States Of America | StatCounter Global Stats immediate goal is to just get a full time somewhere.
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  3. Senior Member
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    MCSA: Server 2012/2016, MCSE: CP&I
    #2
    First of all: Skip getting a Windows 7 Certification. I see your argument that it is 33% of the market but it is on its way out and companies won't be able to use it much longer. Its not worth it. Go for the Windows 10 one. There are differences but for most Help Desk type work, one is just as good as the other.

    Now, moving on to your goal to get a role on a Help Desk. I'm curious if the CCNA is actually hurting you more than it is helping you. If you have as little experience as you say and your toting a CCNA places may assume that you are a paper CCNA and don't really know your stuff. The ones that do believe you may see it as if you are close to getting a Networking role and think that Help Desk is a stop gap for you. Try maybe applying for a couple of roles without telling them about your CCNA and see if it goes better for you. Don't lie or try to hide it but just try to leave it out of the conversation.

    Lastly, as far as getting an MCSA in general. It would probably help in the long term but I would ask questions if someone came to me with an A+, CCNA, and MCSA and no work history. You need to work on that last part and you may need to take something that isn't exactly what you want to get experience. I don't know how old you are but maybe an internship is in order? Try applying at some MSPs?

    Good Luck.
    2018 Goals: Security+
    2019 Goals: 70-744, CISSP
    Completed: MCSA 2012 (01/2016), MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure (07/2017), MCSA 2017 (09/2017)
    Future Goals: CISSP, CCENT
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  4. Senior Member mikey88's Avatar
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    #3
    I too think you're overqualified for helpdesk with a CCNA. Employers see that and know that you will bail the second you get another offer. Take if off your resume now. After a year on helpdesk, start applying for junior network tech roles.
    2018 Goals: CySA+[] CISSP [ ]
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  5. Junior Member
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    Apr 2018
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    #4
    How long did it take you to study for the CCNA? Was it self study?
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  6. Member
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    Mar 2018
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    Surprise, AZ
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    MCSE CP& I, MCSA Server 2016 , MCSA Win10, Security+, N+, MCSA 2003
    #5
    Since you are not at the point where you can walk in and get the Win 7 MCSA, and you'd be studying either 'from scratch', why invest the time in something about to retire? Go for the Win 10 MCSA. My .02....
    MSM-ISS (Information System Security)-'07 Colorado Tech.
    Goals: 70-345/MCSE Productivity? Eventually something Linux flavored?
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  7. Senior Member
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    Nov 2017
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    AS in IT, A+, Network+, Security+
    #6
    Given that they're going to retire Win 7 in 2 years, it would be a massive waste of time.
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  8. Senior Member NetworkingStudent's Avatar
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    MN
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    A+, Network+, and Security+. MTA: OS
    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by imdesperate View Post
    I'm trying to re-enter IT after a being let go from the last IT job I had.That was 2 years ago. Since then I got the CCNA R&S and A+ certs. I've been applying to random Helpdesk jobs and mostly never hear back or I'm told they chose someone who has better qualifications. I think my past job history plus length of time since I last held a technical job (I'm using that term liberally, while there was a ticketing system and break-fix type work done, it revolved entirely around an in-house SaaS app they deployed to client sites) is hurting me.


    I would tell you to go to your local work force center and get your resume reviewed. When employer or recruiter see's your resume they will ask two questions.

    1) Why you were let go from your last help desk?


    2) What have you been doing since you were let go from your last job?

    They may not even ask these questions, but they will certainly thinking "what has he or she been doing the last two years?"

    I don't think getting a Windows 7 or 10 certification will make you more marketable. I think internship might help. Also, try to identify the gaps on your resume.

    https://www.themuse.com/advice/6-maj...ow-to-fix-them

    Problem #3: You Have a Big Gap Between Jobs
    What to Do: According to Jill Knittel, COO of recruiting and staffing firm Employee Relations Associates, significant gaps between jobs are fairly common imperfections that can be handled with two different approaches.

    "One solution is to list just the number of years or months you worked at your earlier positions, rather than the usual start and end dates," Knittel advises. The other approach? "You can also use a functional resume, which elaborates on your skills, instead of a chronological resume. This will take the focus away from time, and on to your abilities and what you can do for a company," she says. If asked in an interview about the time frame of your resume, you will still need to be honest about the gaps, but either of these approaches can de-emphasize them on paper.
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
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