+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last
Results 1 to 25 of 28

Thread: Getting fired

  1. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    30

    Certifications
    CSA+, Security+, Network+, Linux+, LPIC-1, LPI-ES, CCNA R&S, CCENT,ITIL Foundations V3, MTA Sever, MTA Security
    #1

    Default Getting fired

    So I was fired today. I had worked in the private sector for almost 2 years before landing a position with the DoD. All I'll say is it is the last time I ever try to go out of my way to do more work than what was expected of me.


    I was hoping others could share their experiences on getting a new job and what you did if an interviewer asks if you've been fired and why. I'm not sure what to tell potential employers if this comes up.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  2. SS
  3. Senior Member scaredoftests's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    behind you!
    Posts
    2,455

    Certifications
    ACAS,Comp TIA Security +, Novell CNE, HDI Customer Service, ITIL Foundation, MTA
    #2
    You can say your contract was not renewed. Why were you fired? it stinks and I am sorry. I was 'fired'/laid off when the contract was modified or when budget cuts occurred.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  4. Senior Member shochan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    AR
    Posts
    675

    Certifications
    A+, Network+, i-Net+, Novell CNA 5.0, MCP 70-210, Server+, Security+, Cloud+
    #3
    Go have a drink or three...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBnSWJHawQQ

    Then cruz on over to the unemployment office & get that rolling.

    Go revise your resume/dust it off, then start applying tomorrow...With your certs, I am sure you can land something pretty quick.

    Cheers & hi5!
    2018 goals -> PenTest+ Beta (failed), Linux+ Beta (pending results), CEH (mid Dec)
    2019 goals -> Linux+ 103/104 (Jan/Mar/Depends on Beta results), KLCP (June), RHCSA (Dec)
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  5. Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    2,176

    Certifications
    Teradata Database Certified Associate | 70-461 | ITIL ST OSA F V3
    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by johndabomb44 View Post
    So I was fired today. I had worked in the private sector for almost 2 years before landing a position with the DoD. All I'll say is it is the last time I ever try to go out of my way to do more work than what was expected of me.


    I was hoping others could share their experiences on getting a new job and what you did if an interviewer asks if you've been fired and why. I'm not sure what to tell potential employers if this comes up.
    You were terminated from a DOD position? May I ask why?

    I ask because I found the DOD to be very process oriented and very task specific. You have these 3 levers your pull daily and they better be pulled in the right order and at the exact same time, but that was it. Anything above and beyond was actually frowned upon. This was with the USDA, DOD and US Army - Joint Command. All very similar.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  6. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    30

    Certifications
    CSA+, Security+, Network+, Linux+, LPIC-1, LPI-ES, CCNA R&S, CCENT,ITIL Foundations V3, MTA Sever, MTA Security
    #5
    Is flat out lying really the best way? I know employers will actually reach out to prior employers regardless and ask questions.


    I don't want to reveal why I was fired.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  7. Senior Member cyberguypr's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    6,308

    Certifications
    GCFE, GCED, GCIH, GSTRT, CISSP, CCSP, and others that should never be mentioned
    #6
    Not telling? Where's the fun in that?
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  8. Senior Member scaredoftests's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    behind you!
    Posts
    2,455

    Certifications
    ACAS,Comp TIA Security +, Novell CNE, HDI Customer Service, ITIL Foundation, MTA
    #7
    Why did you get fired? You can request not to have people reach out OR don't list it on your resume.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  9. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    30

    Certifications
    CSA+, Security+, Network+, Linux+, LPIC-1, LPI-ES, CCNA R&S, CCENT,ITIL Foundations V3, MTA Sever, MTA Security
    #8
    It was not a GS position.


    "You have these 3 levers your pull daily and they better be pulled in the right order and at the exact same time, but that was it. Anything above and beyond was actually frowned upon."

    "Anything above and beyond was actually frowned upon."

    ^ I just learned that the hard way.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  10. Senior Member scaredoftests's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    behind you!
    Posts
    2,455

    Certifications
    ACAS,Comp TIA Security +, Novell CNE, HDI Customer Service, ITIL Foundation, MTA
    #9
    GS?
    No warnings? Write-up or anything?
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  11. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    30

    Certifications
    CSA+, Security+, Network+, Linux+, LPIC-1, LPI-ES, CCNA R&S, CCENT,ITIL Foundations V3, MTA Sever, MTA Security
    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by scaredoftests View Post
    Why did you get fired? You can request not to have people reach out OR don't list it on your resume.

    Yeah, they're not SUPPOSED to reach out but It's happened to me so I don't believe or trust that for a second.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  12. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,640
    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by johndabomb44 View Post
    Is flat out lying really the best way? I know employers will actually reach out to prior employers regardless and ask questions.
    Many employers will not disclose the reason why an employee was separated. It's fairly common to just confirm dates of employment, title, and salary. But that said, depending on the prospective employer, it may also be common to do informal reference checks. So basically, lying is always a bad idea because that information will eventually come out and it may be grounds for termination.

    Quote Originally Posted by johndabomb44 View Post
    I don't want to reveal why I was fired.
    Do you mean that you don't want to tell a bunch of random people on the Internet or to a prospective employer?
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  13. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    30

    Certifications
    CSA+, Security+, Network+, Linux+, LPIC-1, LPI-ES, CCNA R&S, CCENT,ITIL Foundations V3, MTA Sever, MTA Security
    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by scaredoftests View Post
    GS?
    No warnings? Write-up or anything?


    GS are the "civilian" government employees. Basically, if you can land a GS position, you can go to work and, sit in a seat, and breathe and not be fired. I was not a GS.

    No warnings or write ups for the reason I was being fired. I was written up a month ago for a different reason but that wasn't at all why they fired me.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  14. Senior Member scaredoftests's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    behind you!
    Posts
    2,455

    Certifications
    ACAS,Comp TIA Security +, Novell CNE, HDI Customer Service, ITIL Foundation, MTA
    #13
    I have never had that happen to me. Is there a person that can vouch for you that you worked with there? If you feel that way, don't list it on your resume.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  15. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    30

    Certifications
    CSA+, Security+, Network+, Linux+, LPIC-1, LPI-ES, CCNA R&S, CCENT,ITIL Foundations V3, MTA Sever, MTA Security
    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by paul78 View Post
    Most employers will not disclose the reason why an employee was separated. It's fairly common to just confirm dates of employment, title, and salary. But that said, depending on the prospective employer, it may also be common to do informal reference checks. So basically, lying is always a bad idea because that information will eventually come out and it may be grounds for termination.


    Do you mean that you don't want to tell a bunch of random people on the Internet or to a prospective employer?


    I don't want to tell a bunch of random people. Sorry.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  16. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    30

    Certifications
    CSA+, Security+, Network+, Linux+, LPIC-1, LPI-ES, CCNA R&S, CCENT,ITIL Foundations V3, MTA Sever, MTA Security
    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by scaredoftests View Post
    I have never had that happen to me. Is there a person that can vouch for you that you worked with there? If you feel that way, don't list it on your resume.

    Yeah, there are a few people there now who could vouch for me.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  17. Senior Member LordQarlyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Iraq
    Posts
    527

    Certifications
    PRINCE2, CISSP, ITILv3, CCNA, A+, Net+, Security+, Server+, MCP, MCSA 2003
    #16
    I understand you want to keep it to yourself. It is hard to offer advice because how you approach it for job interviews depends on why you were fired. Somebody fired for sexual harassment or drug/alcohol abuse will have a different road to navigate than someone fired for a workplace mistake that was serious enough. And if it was a security clearance issue, that will require yet another approach.

    Just be honest but don't volunteer anything. If it was something you did that was your fault, try to spin it as "yeah I goofed but I learned from my mistake". If it was friction or a hostile/toxic workplace and you pissed off management, say that but be very delicate about it, don't trash your former boss even if he was a psychopath who kicks his dog around the block when he can find time from beating his kids. I don't have any experience being fired, was only laid off once. When I got asked, I just explained I used the time in the gap to prepare, train, and pass five IT exams.


    Databasehead is right, there are some DoD contract positions that put you in a box and god help you if you step out of that box. I was at NETCOM and it was like that. It didn't matter if there was an emergency outage, even if you invented the system that was broken, you absolutely were forbidden to do anything outside your PWS.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  18. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    427

    Certifications
    MS in Security Information, Sec+,A+, Server+, Network+, Certified Network Defense Profesional (CNDP), Certified Cybercrime Forensic Investigator
    #17
    Really sorry to read that, have a whisky or hang out with some friends.
    Good luck in your search!
    2018 Year goals:
    CCNA Cyber Ops [Done!]
    Extra goals: VCP6-DCV [1%] , CCENT-CCNA [2%]
    "Certs... is all about IT certs!"
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  19. California Kid JoJoCal19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    2,669

    Certifications
    CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, GCIA, GSEC, CCSK, AWS CCP, CEHv8, CHFIv8, ITIL-F, MS Cyber Security, MSISA, BSBA
    #18
    You don't have to create an entire falsehood of what happened, but before my IT career, I was fired from a customer service job as I was out of PTO and my then g/f had to have surgery and I opted to be there. Whatever. Whenever I was asked or had to list it on my applications I just simply stated it wasn't working out and I needed to move on.
    Have: CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, GCIA, GSEC, CCSK, AWS CCP, CEHv8, CHFIv8, ITIL-F, MS Cyber Security - USF, BSBA - UF, MSISA - WGU
    Currently Working On: eJPT, Learning: Linux/CLI, Git, Python, Pentesting
    Next Up:​ eJPT, eCPPTv2, OSCP
    Studying:​ Code Academy (CLI, Git, Python), eLearnSecurity PTSv3
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  20. They are watching you NetworkNewb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Off the grid
    Posts
    2,983

    Certifications
    A+/Net+/Sec+, CCENT, CCNA:Sec, CCSK, GCIH
    #19
    Quote Originally Posted by johndabomb44 View Post
    I was written up a month ago for a different reason but that wasn't at all why they fired me.
    This is the equivalent of holding a piece of cake in front of a 5 year old and telling them they can never touch it!
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  21. Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Posts
    30

    Certifications
    CSA+, Security+, Network+, Linux+, LPIC-1, LPI-ES, CCNA R&S, CCENT,ITIL Foundations V3, MTA Sever, MTA Security
    #20
    Quote Originally Posted by LordQarlyn View Post
    I understand you want to keep it to yourself. It is hard to offer advice because how you approach it for job interviews depends on why you were fired. Somebody fired for sexual harassment or drug/alcohol abuse will have a different road to navigate than someone fired for a workplace mistake that was serious enough. And if it was a security clearance issue, that will require yet another approach.

    Just be honest but don't volunteer anything. If it was something you did that was your fault, try to spin it as "yeah I goofed but I learned from my mistake". If it was friction or a hostile/toxic workplace and you pissed off management, say that but be very delicate about it, don't trash your former boss even if he was a psychopath who kicks his dog around the block when he can find time from beating his kids. I don't have any experience being fired, was only laid off once. When I got asked, I just explained I used the time in the gap to prepare, train, and pass five IT exams.


    Databasehead is right, there are some DoD contract positions that put you in a box and god help you if you step out of that box. I was at NETCOM and it was like that. It didn't matter if there was an emergency outage, even if you invented the system that was broken, you absolutely were forbidden to do anything outside your PWS.

    Thank you for your post, that was helpful

    I will say this if this helps you make a better response:

    I was fired for one of these things: (being late, asking for too big of a raise, telling people to do their job when they weren't actually doing their job)
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  22. Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2,640
    #21
    Quote Originally Posted by johndabomb44 View Post
    I don't want to tell a bunch of random people. Sorry.
    Fair enough. But I would caution you that you don't lie to a prospective employer. You can always soften the reason for the separation - for example - if it was a performance related issue, you could indicate that the job requirements were not a good for your current skills and you were terminated. If you were released because you violated a policy, it depends on what you did.

    Bear in mind that even if your previous employer doesn't disclose the reason for a separation, there are carefully worded questions which are often used - for example "Is John Doe eligible for re-hire?" - many companies will answer that. And if you employer will not answer it, that's sometimes interpreted as an implicit "no".

    Also - don't under-estimate the nature of back-channel references. I've worked at many companies where back-channel references are the norm.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  23. Senior Member scaredoftests's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    behind you!
    Posts
    2,455

    Certifications
    ACAS,Comp TIA Security +, Novell CNE, HDI Customer Service, ITIL Foundation, MTA
    #22
    Just list your reference. Being fired/laid off stinks. Ask a lot of questions on upcoming interviews.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  24. Achieve excellence daily
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    1,425

    Certifications
    CISSP
    #23
    Being fired isn't always a total black mark. Mistakes happen - it's how we react to them that is important. I would hire someone who was reasonably fired from their last position if they could articulate what they learned and how they plan to not make the same mistake again. Of course, this depends on the mistake but it would have to be really bad to be a non-starter. Example "I was fired for x because I did y. I plan to z in order to ensure y doesn't happen again by doing q". If a company isn't reasonable about mistakes then you probably don't want to work there.
    When you go the extra mile, there's no traffic.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  25. Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    2,176

    Certifications
    Teradata Database Certified Associate | 70-461 | ITIL ST OSA F V3
    #24
    Quote Originally Posted by johndabomb44 View Post
    It was not a GS position.


    "You have these 3 levers your pull daily and they better be pulled in the right order and at the exact same time, but that was it. Anything above and beyond was actually frowned upon."

    "Anything above and beyond was actually frowned upon."

    ^ I just learned that the hard way.
    Dood you worked a government job/contract and went above and beyond the call of duty? Dem der are heroics, I thought everyone knew that was a HUGE no-no. That's like G'ment work 101.
    Last edited by DatabaseHead; 06-26-2018 at 08:06 PM.
    Reply With Quote Quote  

  26. Senior Member supasecuritybro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    201

    Certifications
    CISSP, GPEN, GWAPT, eJPT, CySA+
    #25
    Coming out of DoD was the best thing I could do. They do have a process and rather do the dance than resolve things. DoD has a revolving door trying to keep people since they lose talent for better pay and also better treatment. As a contractor (which I was), you get treated as hired help, because you are, but when you work alongside people who are civilians who do not do much bc they are asked not to due to contract requirements it gets hard to not feel like its unbalanced. You either deal with it or get out. Thankfully all my civilian counterparts were really nice and we had a good relationship. Government work is not the best and not for everyone. I would just stay out of gov't if I were you.
    Completed: CISSP, GPEN, GWAPT, eJPT, CySA+, M.S. Information Security
    Current Goal: AWS Solutions Architect - Associate
    Five Year Plan:​ eCTHP (paused again), eCPPT (paused), RHCSA, CISM, OSCP, more SANS as they come
    Book/CBT/Study Material:​ AWS Material
    Reply With Quote Quote  

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 Last

Social Networking & Bookmarks