IT Specific Bachelors Really Matter?

digitalcreepshowdigitalcreepshow Posts: 14Registered Members ■■□□□□□□□□
Hi all,

Stuck in a rut trying to make a decision. I graduated recently with a BS in Business Management from a decent Brick and Mortar school. Through weird circumstances and a little luck, I landed a fantastic IT Systems Analyst job. Long story short, I want to move into security (security analyst role). While I am going to do my best to stay with my current employer, I am keeping my options for other jobs open in the future, especially since there are a lot of opportunities on the security side of IT (given the right knowledge and experience of course). One issue I am slightly concerned about is my current Bachelors degree and how it really isn't technical or IT related much at all. While I know this may not be an issue because of my current job experience (and working on some security certifications on the side), I sure do see a fair number of job ads for Security Analyst positions specifically call for IT related degrees. I spoke with an adviser from my Brick and Mortar school. I can knock out a Bachelors in IT in about a year. Is it really worth it for me at this point? It seems I would benefit more from leveraging my current job experience with some good certifications. At the same time, I am the type that wants all my bases covered. I would hate to lose out on jobs simply because my area of study isn't directly related. Anyone have experience with this or thoughts on it? Thank you all.

Comments

  • yoba222yoba222 Posts: 882Registered Members ■■■■□□□□□□
    Most of the time the only people that care what kind of bachelor's it is are students that don't have the degree and then colleges that want to sell the student a degree. Go for an IT-specific master's if it causes you to lose sleep.
    Obtained: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | CySA+ | PenTest+ | CAPM | eJPT | CCNA R&S | CCNA CyberOps | GCIH | LFCS
    2018: Virtual Hacking Labs
    2019: eCPPT &/or OSCP | CISSP
  • EANxEANx Posts: 914Registered Members ■■■■□□□□□□
    80%+ of employers don't care about the specific degree, a Bachelor's in the "History of Gender-Dismorphic Art" is the same as one in Computer Science. (caveat: always check job board postings for your particular area).

    Get a Bachelor's degree, full-stop.

    Get a Bachelor's degree with courses that interest you. Then get certifications to show you know what to do with the technology of the day. (A+, Nat+, CCNA, MCSA, etc.)

    There are times when the major is important but this is typically when you are planning an advanced degree.
    2018: CCIE Written (R/S) (done - Jan), CCIE R/S
    After that: MBA, OSCP
  • jwdk19jwdk19 Posts: 55Registered Members ■■■□□□□□□□
    In my experience, typically the employers that do care about employees having a degree arent really concerned with what the degree is in.

    Ive previously won out on jobs without having a degree over candidates with a BS in IT ( I had years of experience, military background and certs).

    My current employer actually required a Bachelors from a Regionally Accredited Institution (HR did not care what the degree was in) for my position but hired me with the contigency that I would complete a Bachelors within X amount of time. My recently obtained BS is in Libert Arts  .
  • Basic85Basic85 Posts: 147Registered Members ■■■□□□□□□□
    Most employers I've encountered didn't care about what degree you had so as long as you had a associate/bachelor degree. I'm not quite sure for the reason but it works out for me because I don't have a specific degree in IT though I wish I did.
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Posts: 3,823Registered Members ■■■■■■■■■■
    No they don't
    Goal: MBA, March 2020
  • Info_Sec_WannabeInfo_Sec_Wannabe Senior Member Posts: 342Registered Members ■■■□□□□□□□
    To add on what has been mentioned, I have a colleague at work (both of them are managers) who completed an Architecture degree and another one who completed a Biology or life-science related course. I completed an Accounting degree, but started as an IT Auditor. Employers value experience more than the college degree.
    Three year plan: (2018 ) CISSP [X] and eJPT [ ]; (2019) eCPPT [ ]; (2020) OSCP [ ]
  • williebwillieb Posts: 100Registered Members ■■■□□□□□□□
    It won't be worth it for you to get another degree specifically related to IT. Your current degree, certs in the field you are in or would be applying for, and experience should work great for you.

    Specifically in most IT fields, certs and experience are typically more valuable than a degree in general. This is mainly because degrees are very broad and certs are more focused. And since you already have one you even line yourself up just right for a management job in IT once you get some certs and more experience.
    [X] CCENT ICND1 100-105
    [X] CCNA ICND2 200-105
    [X] CCNP Route 300-101
    [X] CCNP Switch 300-115
    [ ] CCNP Tshoot 300-135
  • victor.s.andreivictor.s.andrei Posts: 69Registered Members ■■■□□□□□□□
    Hi all,

    Stuck in a rut trying to make a decision. I graduated recently with a BS in Business Management from a decent Brick and Mortar school. Through weird circumstances and a little luck, I landed a fantastic IT Systems Analyst job. Long story short, I want to move into security (security analyst role). While I am going to do my best to stay with my current employer, I am keeping my options for other jobs open in the future, especially since there are a lot of opportunities on the security side of IT (given the right knowledge and experience of course). One issue I am slightly concerned about is my current Bachelors degree and how it really isn't technical or IT related much at all. While I know this may not be an issue because of my current job experience (and working on some security certifications on the side), I sure do see a fair number of job ads for Security Analyst positions specifically call for IT related degrees. I spoke with an adviser from my Brick and Mortar school. I can knock out a Bachelors in IT in about a year. Is it really worth it for me at this point? It seems I would benefit more from leveraging my current job experience with some good certifications. At the same time, I am the type that wants all my bases covered. I would hate to lose out on jobs simply because my area of study isn't directly related. Anyone have experience with this or thoughts on it? Thank you all.

    You don't need a second BS/BA in IT. You might need a post-bac in CS/EE/CpE ...but only if you plan on going for a MS CS/EE/CpE, something that can open up all sorts of neat doors (teaching, management, senior-level positions, self-employment, etc.).

    That said, what you need now is certifications, "free tier" accounts at {AWS, Azure, Google}, on-the-job hands-on, a Safari Books subscription, and a solid mentor.
    Q4 '18 Certification Goals: Cisco ICND2; JNCIA-Junos; Linux+; Palo Alto ACE

    2018-2020 Learning Goals: non-degree courses in math (Idaho, Illinois NetMath, VCU) and CS/EE (CU Boulder, CSU)
    in preparation for an application to MS Math + CS/EE dual-master's degree program at a US state school TBD by Q4'21

    To be Jedi is to face the truth...and choose.
    Give off light...or darkness, Padawan.
    Be a candle...or the night.
    (Yoda)
  • ClmClm 5th Raikage (AWS) Denver Metro AreaPosts: 417Registered Members ■■■■□□□□□□
    Does the actual major matters kind of. It depends all on the job some HR look at the degree majors and might not forward you on if the ask for something specificaly. But if you have the proven experince to do the job then no it doesnt matter but if you were looking to get a new degree i would definatly get a masters in something IT related
    I find your lack of Cloud Security Disturbing!!!!!!!!!
    Connect with me on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/myerscraig


  • PCTechLincPCTechLinc Senior Member King City, CAPosts: 541Registered Members ■■■■□□□□□□
    The degree shows that you went through school long enough to pass some classes and show proficiency. The actual content will USUALLY not matter, as it is complemented by certifications and experience. However, if you want to stand out more than the crowd that actually has degrees focused on IT, then I would either go for a Master's, or spend a considerable amount of time further developing the work experience you need, and more advanced certifications.

    Work experience, degrees, and certifications... in IT specifically, that's the name of the game.
    Master of Business Administration in Information Technology Management - Western Governors University
    Master of Science in Information Security and Assurance - Western Governors University
    Bachelor of Science in Network Administration - Western Governors University
    Associate of Applied Science x4 - Heald College
  • ThePawofRizzoThePawofRizzo Senior Member Posts: 379Registered Members ■■■□□□□□□□
    I have a BA in English/Speech from just about the time IT was becoming a "thing". After seeing IT job potential, I got a couple AAS degrees in IT in the years following my Bachelor's. I didn't get my first IT job until I had finished the AAS degrees, so I think they helped. Once you have some experience in IT, regardless of degree, I think that helps. Certs can help. I went back to school, and am nearly done with a BS in IT...but mostly doing so as I consider if I want to pursue a Master's in IT.
  • volfkhatvolfkhat Posts: 944Registered Members ■■■■■■■□□□
    Stuck in a rut trying to make a decision. I graduated recently with a BS in Business Management from a decent Brick and Mortar school. Through weird circumstances and a little luck, I landed a fantastic IT Systems Analyst job. Long story short, I want to move into security (security analyst role). While I am going to do my best to stay with my current employer, I am keeping my options for other jobs open in the future, especially since there are a lot of opportunities on the security side of IT (given the right knowledge and experience of course). One issue I am slightly concerned about is my current Bachelors degree and how it really isn't technical or IT related much at all. While I know this may not be an issue because of my current job experience (and working on some security certifications on the side), I sure do see a fair number of job ads for Security Analyst positions specifically call for IT related degrees. I spoke with an adviser from my Brick and Mortar school. I can knock out a Bachelors in IT in about a year. Is it really worth it for me at this point? It seems I would benefit more from leveraging my current job experience with some good certifications. At the same time, I am the type that wants all my bases covered. I would hate to lose out on jobs simply because my area of study isn't directly related. Anyone have experience with this or thoughts on it? Thank you all.

    Man... i think your entire OP was a complete misdirect.

    If you want to move into infosec.... then start getting Security certs.
    Period.

    Experience also helps, obviously.
    Keeping trying to slide-over via your current employer; companies sometimes allow for this.
    but in the meantime... get come Certs.

    Also,
    you didnt mention how long you've been at your current job.
    How many years of EXP do you have?
    (and please don't say something like 6 - 8 months lol)
Sign In or Register to comment.