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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    Default While I realize this is an entry level Project Management cert.....

    ....I'm really enjoying the study materials. My organization has a huge problem with project management, we simply can't do it effectively in any way, shape, or form and often just go in circles. Many scenarios in the books and practice questions have me laughing and explain a whole lot about how we get in the situations we do. Our entire upper management could benefit from taking this exam.

    Taking the test this week. Should be fun, I really enjoy the concepts.

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    #2
    Your experience in studying, to me, is another example of how important training in the fundamentals can be. I work with techs who have been in IT for a decade, never pursued any type of tech school, training, etc., but think because they've been in IT so long that the A+ or Network+ studies would be beneath them. However, in these same techs day-to-day work they prove again and again how they could truly benefit from studying for certifications, going to school, etc. Since a lot of CompTIAs certs can be gained from independent study, compared to other programs, they are a great fit to foundational learning.

    I've taken most of CompTIA's certification offerings over the last 20 years, and I've never studied for an exam that I haven't learned some things I didn't realize or reviews some topics I'd forgotten.
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  4. Senior Member
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    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by ThePawofRizzo View Post
    Your experience in studying, to me, is another example of how important training in the fundamentals can be. I work with techs who have been in IT for a decade, never pursued any type of tech school, training, etc., but think because they've been in IT so long that the A+ or Network+ studies would be beneath them. However, in these same techs day-to-day work they prove again and again how they could truly benefit from studying for certifications, going to school, etc. Since a lot of CompTIAs certs can be gained from independent study, compared to other programs, they are a great fit to foundational learning.

    I've taken most of CompTIA's certification offerings over the last 20 years, and I've never studied for an exam that I haven't learned some things I didn't realize or reviews some topics I'd forgotten.
    I know good techs that wouldn't stand a chance of passing an A+ test without actually reviewing the content, never mind Network+ This exam though, just because you ran a project and it finished successfully, doesn't mean you did it well or efficiently. On the flip side, just because you have the cert doesn't mean you're any good at it either. It just proves how important professional development is.
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    #4
    I agree. I've worked with guys far more educated than I on paper, that aren't so good at applying the basics. However, I run into far more techs who have not sought any training, who need it. I work with a couple guys that aren't certified that have a desire to learn on their own, and are talented. I've worked with a couple dozen who needed training and certifications, didn't bother to learn much on their own, and boy howdy it shows. So, I bet on training every time.
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  6. Senior Member 636-555-3226's Avatar
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    #5
    I took the Project+ as a stepping-stone to the PMP. You'd be surprised how well it prepares you for the next level! Once you get P+ start working toward the PMP!
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  7. Senior Member
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by 636-555-3226 View Post
    I took the Project+ as a stepping-stone to the PMP. You'd be surprised how well it prepares you for the next level! Once you get P+ start working toward the PMP!
    I figured I'd go for a CAPM. My job doesn't require PMP and I'm afraid I wouldn't be able to maintain the PDU's.
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    #7
    All of the PMBOK-based tests (Project+, CAPM and PMP ) are certainly useful knowledge, particularly if you work at a larger corporation. I have the first two, and I know I've both found them useful, and while studying for them, found that they certainly held true to what I'd had direct experience with at work over the years. They may hold somewhat less weight at newer companies, but certainly older ones tend to stick with some form of project management that lines up pretty well with PMBOK (or they do know formal project management and projects fail)
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  9. Senior Member yoba222's Avatar
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    #8
    My CAPM is expiring next year since it can't be renewed. I'm considering diving into PMP studies at the end of this year. Although my work is heavily projectized, the CAPM knowledge mostly hasn't really applied. A PMP would be of no use to me where I am now.

    I'm thinking that perhaps 2-3 years from now and in a new work environment, perhaps in a management/team lead position, it will have been really nice to have gotten the PMP out of the way. Along the same lines, I'm very grateful my master's is done and out of the way.

    Yeah, CEUs or PDUs or whatever they're called. I find that those are pretty easy if you keep on top of them during the year and document the evidence right when the training is done, even simply taking some screenshots as proof. It's daunting if you've ignored them for 2 1/2 years though.
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  10. Senior Member
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    #9
    Passed my Project+ exam today. 775/900, had 39 minutes remaining out of the 90 when I clicked submit. I was impatient and and we have 20 inches of snow coming tonight so I have a lot to get done. Review Sybex practice questions for the last 2 weeks and read the Sybex book, that was it.

    Ok, now for the funny part, how can I put this on my resume and make it sound like it has value? Obviously I'm not a "certified project manager" or am I?

    Great exam to study for, lots of good stuff to learn.
    [2018] - A+ 901 (PASS), A+ 902 (PASS), Project+ (PASS), Security+ (PASS), Network+(PASS), CySA, Cloud+
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    HR: “What if we train them and they leave?”
    ME: “What if we don’t train them and they stay?”
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  11. Member
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Squished View Post
    HR: “What if we train them and they leave?”
    ME: “What if we don’t train them and they stay?”
    Love this!

    Congrats on the pass. I plan on taking mine in the next week or 2.
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  12. Senior Member
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    #11
    Quote Originally Posted by medic View Post
    Love this!

    Congrats on the pass. I plan on taking mine in the next week or 2.
    Thanks. I'm after Security+ in 2 weeks, maybe 3. We'll see how the study goes.
    [2018] - A+ 901 (PASS), A+ 902 (PASS), Project+ (PASS), Security+ (PASS), Network+(PASS), CySA, Cloud+
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    HR: “What if we train them and they leave?”
    ME: “What if we don’t train them and they stay?”
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  13. Senior Member LittleBIT's Avatar
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    #12
    Squished,

    You must work at an MSP?

    Finding bullets for your resume should be easy, if you're heavy into coordinating projects. Server install, email migrations, tech-refreshes. All that needs to be managed. All stakeholders need to be engaged. Schedules need to be built. Activities need to be mapped, etc.

    Stay warm in Boston, I'm around the area myself.
    Last edited by LittleBIT; 03-14-2018 at 09:28 AM.
    Kindly doing the needful
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  14. Senior Member
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    #13
    I work at a non-profit. I have the bullet points already I'm just curious about calling myself certified vs. Non-certified
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  15. Senior Member yoba222's Avatar
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    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Squished View Post
    . . .Ok, now for the funny part, how can I put this on my resume and make it sound like it has value? Obviously I'm not a "certified project manager" or am I?
    Could probably squeeze the phrase "certified project manager" in the cover letter or in a statement of intent at the top of the resume, but I don't think I'd do it personally. You might wow the HR monkeys at the expense of irritating the hiring manager.
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  16. Senior Member
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    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by yoba222 View Post
    Could probably squeeze the phrase "certified project manager" in the cover letter or in a statement of intent at the top of the resume, but I don't think I'd do it personally. You might wow the HR monkeys at the expense of irritating the hiring manager.
    I know, but anything to get past those HR monkeys. Useless people.
    [2018] - A+ 901 (PASS), A+ 902 (PASS), Project+ (PASS), Security+ (PASS), Network+(PASS), CySA, Cloud+
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    HR: “What if we train them and they leave?”
    ME: “What if we don’t train them and they stay?”
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  17. Member
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    #16
    But really, why not? You hold a project management certification. Isn't that the definition of a certified project manager? You're not saying you are a PMP.

    Maybe say CompTIA certified project manager?
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